The Red Road to Sobriety ( 1995 )

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THE RED ROAD TO SOBRIETY is a feature length documentary exploring The Contemporary Native American Sobriety Movement, currently flourishing in the Indian communities of North America. This vital cultural movement combines ancient spiritual traditions with modern medical approaches to substance abuse recovery. THE RED ROAD TO SOBRIETY documents this vital social movement including The First Annual Native American Alcoholics Anonymous Convention attended by thousands of sober Indian people. The viewer travels with a substance abuse street outreach technician, visits a yearly "Indians In Sobriety" family campout, looks in on an aerobics and weight training studio operating within an ancient pueblo, and witnesses a ceremony where hundreds of participants commit to working toward complete sobriety in the Indian communities by the year 2000. As the historical segment of the program explains, substance abuse in Indian communities must be understood within the context of "The American Holocaust". Few Americans or Canadians are aware that the governments of North America used alcohol in their attempts to destroy Indigenous culture and acquire Indian lands. The devastating effects were compounded by the circulation of "The Drunken Indian" stereotype. Faced with the loss of their religion, land, freedom and pride, Indian families experienced a syndrome known as intergenerational trauma, similar to the experiences of many families of European Holocaust survivors. Despite this serious indictment of governmental abuse, the driving force of the program is the positive spirit emanating from the Indian people interviewed. Through their eyes, one can see hope for each and every individual, and hope foe all mankind.
Genres Documentary
Released Jan 01 1995
Duration 0 minutes
Directed By Gary Rhine
Starring Benjamin Bratt
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